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How to Write the In Case of Emergency Letter To Your Child

How to Write the In Case of Emergency Letter To Your Child

One of the most foundational aspects of creating an effective emergency preparation plan for your family is opening up dialog. This means having open and honest conversations with your children about natural disasters before the unexpected happens. But it also means having a conversation with your child during an emergency event even if you're not physically in the same place.
How to Stock Comfort For Your Child’s Emergency Bag

How to Stock Comfort For Your Child’s Emergency Bag

The comfort pocket of the LadyBugOut emergency bag is designed to give children the opportunity to identify unique items that bring them comfort an important part of ensuring their psychological safety in addition to their physical safety. It’s also meant to encourage interaction and conversations about emergencies between parent and child, which brings additional comfort.
How To Keep Your Child Physically and Psychologically Safe In An Emergency

How To Keep Your Child Physically and Psychologically Safe In An Emergency

As a parent, you certainly understand what it means to try to keep your kids physically safe—you are doing this almost constantly. Sometimes you are the one providing the physical safety (e.g. childproofing your home). Other times, you are providing physical safety by teaching them how to keep themselves safe (e.g. looking both ways before crossing the street).

But what about psychological safety? Psychological safety addresses your child feeling safe, regardless of the presence or absence of a real threat. It is comfort, trust, well-being, and stability.
3 Essential Tips for Talking To Your Kids About Natural Disasters

3 Essential Tips for Talking To Your Kids About Natural Disasters

As a psychologist, I’ve talked to many mothers and fathers who share a common concern: should parents talk to their children about natural disasters and catastrophic events? Isn’t it too frightening and overwhelming for them to process? But here’s the thing: While not talking to your child about these things may shield them from worrisome thoughts in the moment, it also leaves them unprepared and vulnerable. 
Interaction by Developmental Age

Interaction by Developmental Age

The first step to guide your child's interaction with their emergency supplies is to determine your child's developmental age. A child’s developmental age may not always align with their chronological age. Knowing their developmental age will help guide your interaction with your child with their emergency bag so they can feel prepared, empowered, and safe.