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Your Kids Can Do It: Preparing Your Loved Ones for Emergencies

Your Kids Can Do It: Preparing Your Loved Ones for Emergencies

Emergency preparation is my passion, and it’s how I spend a lot of my “free” time. Why? Because practice helps build the skills and muscle memory that’s necessary in the event of a daily disruption or a natural disaster. And it’s an ongoing practice: Despite decades of experience as a medical officer in the Air Force Reserve, you’ll still find me spending parts of my weekends teaching at CERT refresher trainings, observing disaster exercises hosted by local emergency planners and the Red Cross, or taking FEMA courses of interest.
3 Reasons it’s Important to Prepare Your Child for Disasters Before They Happen

3 Reasons it’s Important to Prepare Your Child for Disasters Before They Happen

As someone who has spent decades immersed in the practice and teaching of disaster preparation, I always hoped this knowledge and skills were something that I would pass on to my children. Fast forward to today, and my four-year-old daughter is a bonafide disaster-preparation enthusiast who loves to share her knowledge with friends at school (especially when she gets to demonstrate how to roll oneself up in an emergency thermal blanket like a burrito). 
Why Teaching Your Child Resilience Is So Important For Emergency Prep

Why Teaching Your Child Resilience Is So Important For Emergency Prep

When I think of the term “resilience" as it relates to children, I often think of a rafting trip I went on a while back. At one point during the journey, the guide led us to a series of tall rocks and cliffs and asked if anyone would like to jump off. A number of adults opted in, as did a handful of children who had accompanied their parents.

I watched as the parents made sure the kids’ lifejackets were secure. I watched as they dispensed careful advice about how to jump, how to land, and how to hold their lifejackets down so they wouldn’t get knocked in the face upon impact. But the thing that really struck me in that moment was that the parents could do nothing once their child’s feet left the cliff. It was all up to the child at that point. He or she would have to jump out far enough, stay upright, land feet-down, and hold on to his or her jacket. The parent, at that point, was rendered helpless.