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Your Kids Can Do It: Preparing Your Loved Ones for Emergencies

Your Kids Can Do It: Preparing Your Loved Ones for Emergencies

Emergency preparation is my passion, and it’s how I spend a lot of my “free” time. Why? Because practice helps build the skills and muscle memory that’s necessary in the event of a daily disruption or a natural disaster. And it’s an ongoing practice: Despite decades of experience as a medical officer in the Air Force Reserve, you’ll still find me spending parts of my weekends teaching at CERT refresher trainings, observing disaster exercises hosted by local emergency planners and the Red Cross, or taking FEMA courses of interest.
Preparing Your Child For Hurricanes

Preparing Your Child For Hurricanes

If you live in an area that is prone to tropical storms, you are likely all too familiar with the risks and challenges that come with Hurricane Season. Hurricanes are at risk of hitting for 5 months from June through November, the longest of all the natural disaster seasons. The fact these storms originate days before ever making landfall, that they can vary considerably in their size, intensity, and longevity, and that they often are followed by flooding, all increase the risk of anxiety and stress in children.
3 Reasons it’s Important to Prepare Your Child for Disasters Before They Happen

3 Reasons it’s Important to Prepare Your Child for Disasters Before They Happen

As someone who has spent decades immersed in the practice and teaching of disaster preparation, I always hoped this knowledge and skills were something that I would pass on to my children. Fast forward to today, and my four-year-old daughter is a bonafide disaster-preparation enthusiast who loves to share her knowledge with friends at school (especially when she gets to demonstrate how to roll oneself up in an emergency thermal blanket like a burrito). 
How to Write the In Case of Emergency Letter To Your Child

How to Write the In Case of Emergency Letter To Your Child

One of the most foundational aspects of creating an effective emergency preparation plan for your family is opening up dialog. This means having open and honest conversations with your children about natural disasters before the unexpected happens. But it also means having a conversation with your child during an emergency event even if you're not physically in the same place.
The Importance Of The “Get Started Workbook” In Your Bag

The Importance Of The “Get Started Workbook” In Your Bag

You may still be wondering what makes our bag so different from other emergency bags on the market. I'll start with the most obvious: The bag itself is unique in that it lies flat, with four clear sections that make it possible to immediately recognize the items inside. Each section is stocked with kid-centric products that are bright, colorful, safe, and easy to use. 
How to Stock Comfort For Your Child’s Emergency Bag

How to Stock Comfort For Your Child’s Emergency Bag

The comfort pocket of the LadyBugOut emergency bag is designed to give children the opportunity to identify unique items that bring them comfort an important part of ensuring their psychological safety in addition to their physical safety. It’s also meant to encourage interaction and conversations about emergencies between parent and child, which brings additional comfort.
Why Teaching Your Child Resilience Is So Important For Emergency Prep

Why Teaching Your Child Resilience Is So Important For Emergency Prep

When I think of the term “resilience" as it relates to children, I often think of a rafting trip I went on a while back. At one point during the journey, the guide led us to a series of tall rocks and cliffs and asked if anyone would like to jump off. A number of adults opted in, as did a handful of children who had accompanied their parents.

I watched as the parents made sure the kids’ lifejackets were secure. I watched as they dispensed careful advice about how to jump, how to land, and how to hold their lifejackets down so they wouldn’t get knocked in the face upon impact. But the thing that really struck me in that moment was that the parents could do nothing once their child’s feet left the cliff. It was all up to the child at that point. He or she would have to jump out far enough, stay upright, land feet-down, and hold on to his or her jacket. The parent, at that point, was rendered helpless.
Bib, Sling, Wound Cover, Oh My! 11 Uses For Your Bandana

Bib, Sling, Wound Cover, Oh My! 11 Uses For Your Bandana

The bandana (aka military cravat) is easily the most versatile item in the First Aid section of the LadyBugOut bag. Check out this short video with Dr. Maria LaPlant Hart, for more on the many ways you can use your bandana.

How To Keep Your Child Physically and Psychologically Safe In An Emergency

How To Keep Your Child Physically and Psychologically Safe In An Emergency

As a parent, you certainly understand what it means to try to keep your kids physically safe—you are doing this almost constantly. Sometimes you are the one providing the physical safety (e.g. childproofing your home). Other times, you are providing physical safety by teaching them how to keep themselves safe (e.g. looking both ways before crossing the street).

But what about psychological safety? Psychological safety addresses your child feeling safe, regardless of the presence or absence of a real threat. It is comfort, trust, well-being, and stability.
BugOut Bag Made Just for Kids

BugOut Bag Made Just for Kids

My enthusiasm for bug-out bags runs deep. Long before I started to build LadyBugOut and even before I became a mother, I was deeply invested in being as prepared as possible for an emergency event. I put together bags for my husband and I in case we ever needed to “bug out” of Los Angeles and we kept them stashed in our cars. The bags contained essential supplies to keep us safe, secure, nourished, and powered up: a head lamp, a military-grade first-aid kit, water packets, water purification tablets, high-caloric food rations (3,600 calories each!), jackets, sneakers, a map, a fuel syphon, a solar charger, etc. Utilitarian and functional? Yes. Organized? Not so much.

3 Essential Tips for Talking To Your Kids About Natural Disasters

3 Essential Tips for Talking To Your Kids About Natural Disasters

As a psychologist, I’ve talked to many mothers and fathers who share a common concern: should parents talk to their children about natural disasters and catastrophic events? Isn’t it too frightening and overwhelming for them to process? But here’s the thing: While not talking to your child about these things may shield them from worrisome thoughts in the moment, it also leaves them unprepared and vulnerable. 
Emergency Nutrition Essentials To Keep Your Kids Energized and Hydrated

Emergency Nutrition Essentials To Keep Your Kids Energized and Hydrated

When it comes to being prepared in the event of a natural disaster, one of the most basic recommendations you’ll come across is to have nonperishable food items on hand. Whether you’re using guidelines from FEMA, the Red Cross, or Ready.gov, all three agencies indicate that best practice is to anticipate up to three days — 72 hours — of disruption to public services such as natural gas, water, and electricity. But here’s the thing: 72 hours’ worth of nonperishables is heavy. Especially when you’re only four feet tall and weigh fifty pounds.